A summary bibliography can be found here.

A1 The Pothunters  
 
1st edition: UK 1902, September 18 A & C Black, London
  US 1902, September Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To Joan, Effie, and Ernestine Bowes-Lyon"

The Pothunters first appeared in January 1902 as a serial in Public School Magazine, which had already published several stories and other items by Wodehouse. After two parts (representing chapters 1-6 of the book) had appeared, the publishers announced that the magazine was ceasing publication — its copyrights were sold to the owner of its rival, The Captain — and the third part of the serial (in the last, March 1902, issue) took the form of an extended summary of the rest of the plot.

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A2 A Prefect's Uncle  
 
1st edition: UK 1903, September 11 A & C Black, London
  US 1903, October Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To W Townend"

The story takes place at (fictional) Beckford College.

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A3 Tales of St Austin's  
 
1st edition: UK 1903, November 10 A & C Black, London
  US 1903, December Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "ad matrem" ("to my mother")

Twelve stories and four essays, all with a school theme.

Stories:
  How Pillingshot Scored May 1903 The Captain
 The Odd TrickAugust 1902The Captain
 L'Affaire Uncle JohnAugust 1901Public School Magazine
 Harrison's Slight ErrorJanuary 1903The Captain
 Bradshaw's Little StoryJuly 1902The Captain
 A Shocking Affairnot previously published
 The Babe and the DragonFebruary 1902The Captain
 The Manoeuvres of CharterisAug & Sept 1903The Captain
 How Payne Bucked UpOctober 1902The Captain
 Author!October 1901Public School Magazine
 The Tabby TerrorFebruary 1902Public School Magazine
 The Prize PoemJuly 1901Public School Magazine
Essays
 WorkDecember 1900Public School Magazine
 NotesFebruary 1901Public School Magazine
 Now Talking about CricketJuly 1901Public School Magazine
 The Tom Brown QuestionDecember 1901Public School Magazine
 
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A4 The Gold Bat  
 
1st edition: UK 1904, September 13 A & C Black, London
  US 1923 Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To That Prince of Slackers, Herbert Westbrook"

The Gold Bat was serialised in The Captain between October 1903 and March 1904. It was serialised again in The Boys' Friend (UK) from 6 January to 24 February 1923 under the title By Order of the League.

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A5 William Tell Told Again  
 
1st edition: UK 1904, November 11 A & C Black, London
  US 1904, December Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To Biddy O'Sullivan for a Christmas Present"

This is a retelling of the traditional legend in pictures, verse and prose. The illustrations, by Philip Dadd, were each accompanied by a verse written by John W Houghton. Wodehouse wrote the prose text.

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A6 The Head of Kay's  
 
1st edition: UK 1905, October 5 A & C Black, London
  US 1922 Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To my father"

The story takes place at (fictional) Eckleton School.

The Head of Kay's was serialised in The Captain between October 1904 and March 1905.

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A7 Love Among the Chickens  
 
1st edition: UK 1906, June George Newnes, London
  US 1909, May 11 Circle Publishing, New York

Dedication: "To Sir Bargrave and Lady Deane" (Sir Henry Bargrave Deane, a noted barrister, was related to Wodehouse through the latter's mother; he had been knighted and made a judge in 1905)

The 1906 version was serialised in Circle magazine (US) between September 1908 and March 1909.

Revised 1st ed: UK 1921, June (?) Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication: "To W Townend . . . (a lengthy dedication giving credit to Bill Townend for the original idea)

The novel was extensively revised and re-issued in a new edition in 1921. In the 1906 version, the first five chapters were narrated in the third person, before shifting to the first person thereafter; the 1921 version is narrated in the first person throughout. The later version also has an improved ending. Despite these changes, the two versions are sufficiently similar not to be considered different books.

This is the only novel featuring Ukridge (who otherwise appears only in short stories) and the only story in which he is married: in the later "Ukridge Rounds a Nasty Corner" (1924) he is merely engaged, while in "No Wedding Bells for Him" (1923) he is temporarily engaged to a different girl.

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A8 The White Feather  
 
1st edition: UK 1907, October 9 A & C Black, London
  US 1907, December Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To my brother Dick"

The White Feather was serialised in The Captain between October 1905 and March 1906. According to Wodehouse's preface, the time of the story is a year and a term after the events in The Gold Bat [A4], the history of Wrykyn in between the two books being dealt with in a number of short stories that appeared in magazines. Several of these stories were collected in Tales of Wrykyn and Elsewhere (1997).

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A9 Not George Washington  
 
1st edition: UK 1907, October 18 Cassell, London
  US 1980, April 10 Continuum, New York

Dedication: "To Ella King-Hall" (Westbrook's wife and Wodehouse's UK literary agent)

Not George Washington was co-authored with Herbert Westbrook, whose name appears first on the title page in the UK edition.

Much of the book is a lightly-fictionalised account of Wodehouse's early career as a writer and journalist in London. For example, one of the book's main characters writes the "On Your Way" column for the Orb newspaper; at the time, Wodehouse and Westbrook were writing the "By the Way" column for the Globe newspaper.

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A10 The Globe By the Way Book  
 
1st edition: UK 1908, June "The Globe" Publishing, London
  US 1985 James H Heineman, New York

Dedication: "To Ella King-Hall" (Westbrook's wife and Wodehouse's UK literary agent)

Sub-titled "A Literary Quick-Lunch for People Who Have Only Got Five Minutes to Spare", this is a compilation of columns from the Globe newspaper's "By the Way" column, written by Wodehouse and Westbrook. The original edition is the rarest Wodehouse book; the 1985 US edition was a facsimile limited edition.

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A11 The Swoop!  
 
1st edition: UK 1908, June Alston Rivers, London
  US 1979, May 14 The Seabury Press, New York
  US 1993 James H Heineman, New York

The Swoop! satirises the "invasion scare" stories that were fashionable at the time in England. An adapted and shortened version was serialised in Vanity Fair (US) in 1915, under the title The Military Invasion of America, but the original version was not published in the US until 1979, in a collection, The Swoop! and Other Stories [B20]. The 1993 edition was a facsimile limited edition.

In his Preface to the book, Wodehouse professed, very much tongue-in-cheek, to have written the story "purely from a feeling of patriotism and duty" to rouse England "to a sense of her peril", and signed it from "The Bomb-Proof Shelter, London, W".

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A12 Mike  
 
1st edition: UK 1909, September 15 A & C Black, London
  US 1910, February Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To Alan Durand"

Enter Psmith UK 1935, February 14 A & C Black, London
  US 1935, September 17 Macmillan, New York (offset from UK edition)
 
Mike at Wrykyn UK 1953, February Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1968 Meredith Press, New York

The original edition of Mike brought together in book form two serials, Jackson Junior and The Lost Lambs, which had previously appeared in The Captain magazine from April to September 1907 and from April to September 1908 respectively.

In 1935, chapters 30-59 of the book were re-published with minor changes under the title Enter Psmith in both the UK [A12c] and, offset from the UK edition, in the US [A12d].

In 1953, Enter Psmith was reissued in the UK under yet another new title, Mike and Psmith, while chapters 1-29 of the original book were published simultaneously with minor changes under the title Mike at Wrykyn [A12e]. The 1968 US edition of Mike at Wrykyn includes an Introduction by Wodehouse.

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A13 A Gentleman of Leisure (US title: The Intrusion of Jimmy)  
 
1st edition: US 1910, May 11 W J Watt, New York
  UK 1910, November 15 Alston Rivers, London

Dedication (UK edition only): "To Herbert Westbrook, without whose never-failing advice, help, and encouragement this book would have been finished in half the time"

Dedication (UK edition, 1921 reissue): "To Douglas Fairbanks, who many years ago played 'Jimmy' in the dramatised version of this novel"

The basic plot of A Gentleman of Leisure first appeared in a novella, The Gem Collector, in the December 1909 issue of Ainslee's magazine. A substantially revised and expanded version, with the title changed to The Intrusion of Jimmy, was published as a book in the US in May 1910. It was serialised under that title in the British weekly magazine Titbits, between June and September 1910, before being published, as A Gentleman of Leisure, in November 1910. According to Jasen, there are minor textual differences between the American and British editions.

Wodehouse collaborated with playwright John Stapleton in adapting A Gentleman of Leisure for the stage, The play, which starred Douglas Fairbanks as Jimmy Pitt, opened at the Playhouse Theatre, New York, on 24 August 1911. It was revived at McVicker's Theatre, Chicago, on 30 March 1913, under the title A Thief for a Night, with John Barrymore as Jimmy.

A Gentleman of Leisure has twice been made into a film. In March 1915, it was the first of Wodehouse's works to be filmed, with Cecil B DeMille credited as a scriptwriter, after Stapleton and Wodehouse. In July 1923 it was re-made as a film in a new adaptation that did not involve Wodehouse or Stapleton.

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A14 Psmith in the City  
 
1st edition: UK 1910, September 23 A & C Black, London
  US 1910, November Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Dedication: "To Leslie Havergal Bradshaw"

Psmith in the City was serialised in The Captain between October 1908 and March 1909, under the title The New Fold. According to the Preface, it takes up the story of Mike and Psmith about a month after they have left school.

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A15b The Prince and Betty (UK version)  
 
1st edition: UK 1912, May 1 Mills & Boon, London

Dedication: "To Ellaline Terris from The Hermit" (Ellaline Terris was one of the stars of The Gay Gordons (1907), a musical for which Wodehouse contributed lyrics)

The Prince and Betty was first published in Ainslee's magazine (US) in January 1912 and, with some differences, was serialised in Strand magazine (UK) between February and April 1912, before being published in book form in the UK in May 1912; this version has never been published in the US.

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A15a The Prince and Betty (US version)  
 
1st edition: US 1912, February 14 W J Watt, New York

The US version of The Prince and Betty was published in February 1912, a month after the appearance of a story with the same title in Ainslee's magazine, but the two differ considerably. The first eleven chapters of the book follow the magazine version, but from chapter twelve onwards the story-line is merged with the plot of Psmith, Journalist (which had not, at that time, appeared in the US). The latter was changed to reflect the US setting: for example, Wrykyn-educated Psmith becomes Harvard-educated Rupert Smith.

A silent film of The Prince and Betty, adapted by Fred Myton and directed by Robert Thornby, was released in December 1919.

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A15c Psmith, Journalist  
 
1st edition: UK 1915, September 29 A & C Black, London
  US 1915 Macmillan, New York (from imported sheets)

Psmith, Journalist was serialised in The Captain between October 1909 and March 1910 but was not published in book form until 1915. In the meantime, the US version of The Prince and Betty had been published, in 1912; this merged the plots of Psmith, Journalist and the UK version of The Prince and Betty. Possibly because of this, Psmith, Journalist was not separately published in the US but was printed there from imported UK sheets.

To summarise a complicated situation, the UK editions of The Prince and Betty and Psmith, Journalist followed the magazine versions, while the US edition of The Prince and Betty combined elements from both, with significant changes.

As a further complication, Wodehouse completely re-wrote the US version of the story and, in 1931, it was serialised in an obscure US magazine, The Illustrated Love Magazine under the title A Prince for Hire; a book edition of this version was published in 2003.

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A16 The Little Nugget  
 
1st edition: UK 1913, August 28 Methuen, London
  US 1914, January 10 W J Watt, New York

The Little Nugget was first published in Munsey's Magazine in August 1913. An earlier version, without the love interest, had appeared as a serial in The Captain between January and March 1913 under the title The Eighteen-Carat Kid.

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A17 The Man Upstairs  
 
1st edition: UK 1914, January 23 Methuen, London

Nineteen short stories that had previously appeared in UK magazines; thirteen had also appeared in US magazines, one made a subsequent magazine appearance (under a different title), two each were included in collections published posthumously in the US, The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979) and The Uncollected Wodehouse (1976), and one has never appeared in the US.

The Man Upstairs 1 2 UK March 1910 Strand
 USMarch 1910Cosmopolitan
 USApril 1934Serenade
 
Something to Worry AboutUKFebruary 1913Strand
 US The Swoop! and Other Stories
 
Deep Waters 3UKJune 1910Strand
 US28 May 1910Collier's Weekly
 
When Doctors DisagreeUKDecember 1910Strand
 US The Uncollected Wodehouse
 
By Advice of CounselUKJuly 1910Strand
 USSeptember 1910Pictorial Review
 
Rough-Hew Them How We Will 2UKApril 1910Strand
 USAugust 1910Cosmopolitan
 
The Man Who Disliked CatsUKMay 1912Strand
 USJanuary 1916Ladies Home Journal 4
 
Ruth in Exile 1UKJuly 1912Strand
 USAugust 1912Ainslee's
 
Archibald's BenefitUKJuly 1909Pearson's 5
 US19 March 1910Collier's Weekly
 
The Man, the Maid and the MiasmaUKFebruary 1910Grand
 USJune 1910Cosmopolitan
 
The Good Angel 1 2UKFebruary 1910Strand
 USFebruary 1910Cosmopolitan 6
 
Pots o' MoneyUKDecember 1911Strand
 US The Uncollected Wodehouse
 
Out of SchoolUKOctober 1910Strand
 USSeptember 1909Ainslee's
 
Three from DunstervilleUKAugust 1911Strand
 USAugust 1912Pictorial Review
 
The Tuppenny MillionaireUKOctober 1912Strand
 US The Swoop! and Other Stories
 
Ahead of ScheduleUKNovember 1910Grand
 US28 January 1911Collier's Weekly
 
Sir Agravaine 7UKDecember 1912Pearson's
 US29 June 1912Collier's Weekly
 
The Goal-Keeper and the Plutocrat 3UKJanuary 1912Strand
 US24 September 1910Collier's Weekly 8
 
In AlcalaUKDecember 1911London Magazine
 US never published in the US
 
1 Republished in the misleadingly-named The Uncollected Wodehouse (1976)
2 Setting adapted to the country of publication
3 Republished in The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979)
4 Magazine title: "The Fatal Kink in Algernon"
5 Published as a cricket story, "Reginald's Record Knock"; the book version has a golf background
6 Magazine title: "The Matrimonial Sweepstakes"; differs slightly from the book version
7 A book version of "Sir Agravaine", illustrated by Rodger McPhail, was published in 1984
8 Magazine title: "The Pitcher and the Plutocrat"; originally a baseball story, it was given a soccer background for the UK version

"The Matrimonial Sweepstakes" is a longer version of "The Good Angel". In one passage that is absent from the latter, the butler, Keggs, refers to having previously worked for Lord Emsworth: this is the first mention of that peer in print.

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A18 Something Fresh (US title: Something New)  
 
1st edition: US 1915, September 3 D Appleton, New York
  UK 1915, September 16 Methuen, London

Something New was serialised in The Saturday Evening Post (US) from 26 June to 14 August 1915. The US edition contains a scene running to about 20 pages which had appeared in substantially the same form in The Lost Lambs; this is absent from the UK edition.

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A19 Uneasy Money  
 
1st edition: US 1916, March 17 D Appleton, New York
  UK 1917, October 4 Methuen, London

Dedication (US edition only): "To My Wife, Bless Her"

Uneasy Money was serialised in The Saturday Evening Post (US) from 4 December 1915 to 15 January 1916 and in Strand magazine (UK) between December 1916 and June 1917. According to McIlvaine, "[t]he English edition is considerably cut from the Strand and from the American editions".

A silent film of Uneasy Money was released in December 1917.

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A20 Piccadilly Jim  
 
1st edition: US 1917, February 24 Dodd, Mead, New York
  UK 1918, May Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (US edition only): "To my step-daughter Lenora [sic], conservatively speaking the most wonderful child on earth"

Piccadilly Jim was serialised in The Saturday Evening Post (US) from 16 September to 11 November 1916.

Guy Bolton dramatised Piccadilly Jim in 1918 and it was filmed in 1919. In 1936, MGM produced a re-make of the film, with Robert Montgomery in the title role. In 2004, the book was adapted by Julian Fellowes for a third film, which starred Sam Rockwell as Jimmy Crocker.

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A21 The Man with Two Left Feet  
 
1st edition: UK 1917, March 8 Methuen, London
  US 1933, February 1 A L Burt, New York

The Man with Two Left Feet is a collection of short stories. The contents of the UK and US editions differ significantly: in the following list, blue titles appeared only in the UK edition, red titles only in the US edition.

Bill the Bloodhound UK April 1915 Strand
 USFebruary 1915Century
 
Extricating Young GussieUKJanuary 1916Strand
 US18 September 1915Saturday Evening Post
 
Wilton's HolidayUKJuly 1915Strand
 US19 March 1916 Illustrated Sunday Magazine 1
 US19 March 1916 Minneapolis Tribune Sunday Mag 1
 
The Mixer: He Meets a Shy GentlemanUKNovember 1915Strand
 USJune 1916The Red Book 2
 
The Mixer: He Moves in SocietyUKDecember 1915Strand
 USJuly 1916The Red Book 3
 
Crowned HeadsUKApril 1915Pearson's
 USJune 1914Argosy
 
At Geisenheimer'sUKOctober 1915Strand 4
 US21 August 1915Saturday Evening Post
 
The Making of Mac'sUKMay 1915Strand
 USMay 1916The Red Book 5
 
One Touch of NatureUSAugust 1914McClure's 6
 
Black for LuckUKJune 1915Strand
 USJuly 1915The Red Book 7
 
The Romance of an Ugly PolicemanUKJanuary 1915Strand
 USApril 1915Ainslee's 8
 
A Sea of Troubles 9UKJune 1915Pearson's
 USSeptember 1914McClure's
 
The Man with Two Left FeetUKMay 1916Strand
 US18 March 1916Saturday Evening Post
 
Absent Treatment 10UKMarch 1911Strand
 US22 August 1911Collier's Weekly
 
Rallying Round Old George 10UKDecember 1912Strand
 US27 September 1913Collier's Weekly 11
 
Doing Clarence a Bit of Good 10UKMay 1913Strand
 USApril 1914Pictorial Review 12
 
1Magazine title: "Wilton's Vacation"
2Magazine title: "A Very Shy Gentleman"
3Magazine title: "Breaking into Society"
4Magazine title: "The Love-r-ly Silver Cup"
5Magazine title: "The Romance of "Mac's""
6Magazine title: "Brother Fans"; a baseball story not published separately in the UK
7Magazine title: "A Black Cat for Luck"
8Reprinted in Ainslee's in September 1926
9Title is "A Sea of Trouble" in the US edition and the story is set in the US
10Published in the UK in My Man Jeeves [A22]
11Magazine title: "Brother Alfred"
12Magazine title: "Rallying Round Clarence"

"Extricating Young Gussie" features the first appearance in print of Jeeves and Bertie (though the surname Wooster is not mentioned).

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A22 My Man Jeeves  
 
1st edition: UK 1919, May George Newnes, London

My Man Jeeves brings together four short stories featuring Jeeves and Wooster and four featuring Reggie Pepper, a prototype of the "Wooster" character. This collection was not published in the US.

Three of the Pepper stories had been included in the US edition of The Man with Two Left Feet [A21]. The fourth, "Helping Freddie", rewritten as a J&W story, was included in the collection Carry On, Jeeves [A34], together with revised versions of the four J&W stories. The original version of "Helping Freddie" was included in a collection entitled Enter Jeeves, published in 1997.

The plot of another of the Pepper stories, "Doing Clarence a Bit of Good", became the basis for a J&W story, "Jeeves Makes an Omelette", which was published in A Few Quick Ones [A82], while another, "Rallying Round Old George", was rewritten as a Mulliner story, "George and Alfred", which appeared in Plum Pie [A89].

Leave It to Jeeves 1 UK June 1916 Strand
 US5 February 1916Saturday Evening Post
 
Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest 2UKMarch 1917Strand
 US9 December 1916Saturday Evening Post
 
Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg 2UKAugust 1917Strand
 US3 March 1917Saturday Evening Post
 
Absent Treatment 3
 
Helping Freddie 4UKSeptember 1911Strand
 USMarch 1912Pictorial Review 5
 
Rallying Round Old George 3
 
Doing Clarence a Bit of Good 3
 
The Aunt and the Sluggard 2UKAugust 1916Strand
 US22 April 1916Saturday Evening Post
 
1Revised for Carry On, Jeeves [A34] and renamed "The Artistic Career of Corky"
2Revised for Carry On, Jeeves
3Included in the US edition of The Man with Two Left Feet [A21]
4Rewritten as a Jeeves & Wooster story for Carry On, Jeeves and retitled "Fixing It for Freddie"
5Magazine title: "Lines and Business"

Wodehouse and Herbert Westbrook collaborated in adapting "Rallying Round Old George" as a play, Brother Alfred. After a trial run at Eastbourne in March 1913, the play opened at the London's Savoy Theatre on 8 April 1913, but closed after only 14 performances. In 1932, the play was made into a film, directed by Harry Edwards; two of the cast, Gene Gerrard and Molly Lamont, also appeared in another Wodehouse adaptation, Leave It to Me, in 1933.

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A23 The Coming of Bill (US title: Their Mutual Child)  
 
1st edition: US 1919, August 5 Boni & Liveright, New York
  UK 1920, July 1 Herbert Jenkins, London

The Coming of Bill was first published in Munsey's Magazine in May 1914 under the title The White Hope. According to Wodehouse (in a letter quoted in McIlvaine) he was given the plot by the then editor of Munsey's "and I wrote it, but I have never thought highly of it."

A film version of Their Mutual Child was released in December 1920.

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A24 A Damsel in Distress  
 
1st edition: US 1919, October 4 George H Doran, New York
  UK 1919, October 15 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (US edition): "To Maud and Ivan Caryll"

A Damsel in Distress was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post between 10 May and 28 June 1919.

A silent film of A Damsel in Distress was released in October 1919. The novel was adapted as a screen musical in 1937; starring Fred Astaire and Joan Fontaine, it featured music by George Gershwin and lyrics by his brother Ira.

In 1928, Wodehouse and Ian Hay collaborated in adapting the story for the stage; it was produced at the New Theatre, London, on 13 August that year and ran for 234 performances.

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A25 Jill the Reckless (US title: The Little Warrior)  
 
1st edition: US 1920, October 8 George H Doran, New York
  UK 1921, July 4 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (UK edition): "To my wife, bless her"

Jill the Reckless was serialised in Collier's (US) from 10 April to 28 August 1920 and in Maclean's (Canada) from 1 August to 15 November 1920, in both cases under the title The Little Warrior, and, under the title Jill the Reckless, in The Grand Magazine (UK) between September 1920 and June 1921.

The book includes passing references to George Bevan, the hero of A Damsel in Distress [A24], and to an unspecified member of the Earl of Emsworth's family, the Threepwoods.

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A26 Indiscretions of Archie  
 
1st edition: UK 1921, February 14 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1921, July 15 George H Doran, New York

Dedication: "To B W King-Hall"

Indiscretions of Archie (there is no definite article!) began life as a series of magazine stories that Wodehouse "hacked about" (his words) to produce a novel.

The Man Who Married an Hotel UK March 1920 Strand
 USMay 1920Cosmopolitan 1
 
Archie and the Sausage ChappieUKApril 1920Strand
 USJune 1920Cosmopolitan 2
 
Dear Old SquiffyUKMay 1920Strand
 USJuly 1920Cosmopolitan
 USJanuary 1933Golden Book Magazine
 
Doing Father a Bit of GoodUKJune 1920Strand
 USAugust 1920Cosmopolitan
 
Paving the Way for MabelUKJuly 1920Strand
 USSeptember 1920Cosmopolitan
 
Washy Makes His Presence FeltUKAugust 1920Strand
 USOctober 1920Cosmopolitan
 
A Room at the HermitageUKSeptember 1920Strand
 USNovember 1920Cosmopolitan 3
 
First Aid For Looney BiddleUKOctober 1920Strand
 USDecember 1920Cosmopolitan
 
Mother's KneeUKNovember 1920Strand
 USJanuary 1921Cosmopolitan
 
Strange Experience of an Artist's ModelUKJanuary 1921Strand
 US 4  
 
The Wigmore VenusUKFebruary 1921Strand
 USFebruary 1921Cosmopolitan
 
1Magazine title has ". . . a Hotel"
2Magazine title: "The Sausage Chappie"
3Magazine title: "A Bit of All Right"
4Collected in Wodehouse on Crime (1981) under the title "Indiscretions of Archie"

The UK first edition is notorious for a misprint, "consumed eight friend [sic] potatoes".

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A27 The Clicking of Cuthbert (US title: Golf without Tears)  
 
1st edition: UK 1922, February 3 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1924, May 28 George H Doran, New York

Dedication: "To the Immortal Memory of John Henrie and Pat Rogie . . ." (see the full text here)

This is a collection of ten stories with a golfing background. All but the last are narrated by the Oldest Member, who makes his first appearance in this book.

The Clicking of Cuthbert UK October 1921 Strand 1
 USJuly 1922Elk's Magazine 2
 
A Woman is Only a WomanUKOctober 1919Strand
 US7 June 1919Saturday Evening Post
 
A Mixed ThreesomeUKMarch 1921Strand
 USJune 1920McClure's
 
Sundered HeartsUKDecember 1920Strand
 USDecember 1920McClure's
 
The Salvation of George MackintoshUKJune 1921Strand
 USSeptember 1921McClure's
 
Ordeal by GolfUKFebruary 1920Strand 3
 US6 December 1919Collier's
 
The Long HoleUKAugust 1921Strand
 USMarch 1922McClure's
 
The Heel of AchillesUKNovember 1921Strand
 US11 June 1922Chicago Tribune
 US11 June 1922St Louis Globe-Democrat Sunday Mag 4
 
The Rough StuffUKApril 1921Strand
 US10 October 1920Chicago Tribune
 
The Coming of GowfUKMay 1921Strand
 USJune-July 1921McClure's
 
1Magazine title: "The Unexpected Clicking of Cuthbert"
2Magazine title: "Cuthbert Unexpectedly Clicks"
3Magazine title: "A Kink in His Character"
4The Addendum gives the year as 1952 (surely a misprint as that date fell on a Wednesday)

There are minor differences between the UK and US edition, mainly as regards proper names and locations.

Three of the stories in The Clicking of Cuthbert — the title story, "Ordeal by Golf" and "The Long Hole" — were filmed in 1924 by a British company, Stoll Picture Productions, as part of a series of six adaptations of Wodehouse golf stories; the other three stories subsequently formed part of the collection in The Heart of a Goof [A36]. In the title story, the role of Cuthbert was played by Peter Haddon, who played Tony in the stage play Who's Who? that Wodehouse and Bolton adapted from the novel If I Were You [A44], and Bill in the 1939 film adaptation of Good Morning, Bill.

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A28 The Girl on the Boat (US title: Three Men and a Maid)  
 
1st edition: US 1922, April 26 George H Doran, New York
  UK 1922, June 15 Herbert Jenkins, London

The Girl on the Boat was serialised in Pan magazine (UK) between February and September 1921 and in Woman's Home Companion (US) between October and December 1921, in both cases under its American title, Three Men and a Maid.

The UK edition includes a preface, "One Moment!", at the end of which Wodehouse gives his address as "Constitutional Club, Northumberland Avenue", which, it has been suggested, he used as the model for his fictional Senior Conservatives Club.

A film of The Girl on the Boat was released in 1961, starring Millicent Martin as Billie (the "Maid" of the alternative title), with Norman Wisdom as Sam Marlowe, Richard Briers as Eustace Hignett, and Philip Locke as Bream Mortimer (the "Three Men").

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A29 The Adventures of Sally (US title: Mostly Sally)  
 
1st edition: UK 1922, October 17 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1923, March 23 George H Doran, New York

Dedication (UK edition): "To George Grossmith" (at the time, he and Wodehouse were working together on the book and lyrics for the musical comedy The Cabaret Girl)

The Adventures of Sally was serialised in Collier's magazine (US) from 8 October to 31 December 1921, and in Grand magazine (UK) from April 1922. It was later serialised again, under its American title, Mostly Sally, in The Household Magazine (US) between November 1925 and April 1926.

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A30 The Inimitable Jeeves (US title: Jeeves)  
 
1st edition: UK 1923, May 17 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1923, September 28 George H Doran, New York

This is best described as a collection of short stories masquerading as an episodic novel. It consists of 11 stories that had previously appeared in the Strand in the UK and, bar one, in Cosmopolitan in the US. The first six stories and the last were each split in two and given new titles, to make a book with 18 chapters. In the following list, the titles of the split chapters are given in parentheses below the original title.

Jeeves in the Springtime
    (Jeeves Exerts the Old Cerebellum — No Wedding Bells for Bingo)
 UKDecember 1921Strand
 USDecember 1921Cosmopolitan
 
Aunt Agatha Takes the Count
    (Aunt Agatha Speaks Her Mind — Pearls Mean Tears)
 UKApril 1922Strand
 USOctober 1922Cosmopolitan 1
 USJuly 1991Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine
 
Scoring Off Jeeves
    (The Pride of the Woosters is Wounded — The Hero's Reward)
 UKFebruary 1922Strand
 USMarch 1922Cosmopolitan 2
 
Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch
    (Introducing Claude and Eustace — Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch)
 UKMarch 1922Strand
 USApril 1922Cosmopolitan 3
 
Jeeves and the Chump Cyril
    (A Letter of Introduction — Startling Dressiness of a Lift Attendant)
 UKAugust 1918Strand
 US8 June 1918Saturday Evening Post
 
Comrade Bingo
    (Comrade Bingo — Bingo Has a Bad Goodwood)
 UKMay 1922Strand
 USMay 1922Cosmopolitan
 
The Great Sermon Handicap 4UKJune 1922Strand
 USJune 1922Cosmopolitan
 
The Purity of the TurfUKJuly 1922Strand
 USJuly 1922Cosmopolitan
 
The Metropolitan TouchUKSeptember 1922Strand
 USSeptember 1922Cosmopolitan
 
The Delayed Exit of Claude and EustaceUKOctober 1922Strand
 USNovember 1922Cosmopolitan
 
Bingo and the Little Woman
    (Bingo and the Little Woman — All's Well)
 UKNovember 1922Strand
 USDecember 1922Cosmopolitan
 
1Magazine title: "Aunt Agatha Makes a Bloomer"
2Magazine title: "Bertie Gets Even"
3Magazine title: "Jeeves and the Blighter"
4Published separately in 1933 (McIlvaine A49)

In 1989, "The Great Sermon Handicap" was published in six volumes containing translations into 58 languages, including such widely-read languages as Chaucerian English, "Rhaetoromanisch" (presumably Romansch is intended) and Coptic.

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A31 Leave It to Psmith  
 
1st edition: UK 1923, November 30 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1924, March 14 George H Doran, New York

Dedication: "To my daughter Leonora, Queen of her species": the novel was written at the instigation of Leonora, who wanted another story about Psmith.

Leave It to Psmith was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 3 February to 24 March 1923 (McIlvaine says 17 March, but lists the issue of 24 March under the SEP entry) and in the Grand (UK) between April and December 1923.

Wodehouse made significant changes to the story before it was published in book form. In particular, he completely revised the ending of the story.

This is the second novel in the "Blandings saga" and marks last appearance of Psmith.

Wodehouse and Ian Hay collaborated in adapting the novel for the stage; the play received its first performance at the Shaftesbury Theatre, London, on 29 September 1930, and was later collected in the omnibus volume Four Plays (1983).

In 1933, the play was loosely adapted as a film, Leave It to Me, directed by Monty Banks and starring Gene Gerrard (who also co-wrote the screenplay) and Molly Lamont, who had appeared together in the film version of Brother Alfred in 1932.

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A32 Ukridge (US title: He Rather Enjoyed It)  
 
1st edition: UK 1924, June 3 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1925, July 30 George H Doran, New York

"Dedicated with esteem and gratitude to old Bill Townend my friend from boyhood's days who first introduced me to Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge"

Ten stories about Ukridge, narrated by his friend "Corky" Corcoran. All the stories had previously appeared in the Strand in the UK and, one month earlier, in Cosmopolitan in the US.

Ukridge's Dog College UK May 1923 Strand
 USApril 1923Cosmopolitan
 
Ukridge's Accident SyndicateUKJune 1923Strand 1
 USMay 1923Cosmopolitan
 
The Debut of Battling BillsonUKJuly 1923Strand
 USJune 1923Cosmopolitan
 
First Aid for DoraUKAugust 1923Strand
 USJuly 1923Cosmopolitan
 
The Return of Battling BillsonUKSeptember 1923Strand
 USAugust 1923Cosmopolitan
 
Ukridge Sees Her ThroughUKOctober 1923Strand
 USSeptember 1923Cosmopolitan
 
No Wedding Bells for HimUKNovember 1923Strand
 USOctober 1923Cosmopolitan
 
The Long Arm of Looney CooteUKDecember 1923Strand
 USNovember 1923Cosmopolitan
 
The Exit of Battling BillsonUKJanuary 1924Strand
 USDecember 1923Cosmopolitan
 
Ukridge Rounds a Nasty CornerUKFebruary 1924Strand
 USJanuary 1924Cosmopolitan
 
1Magazine title: "Ukridge, Teddy Weeks and the Tomato"

The Ukridge chronology seems to operate in reverse. In the earlier Love Among the Chickens (1906, revised 1921) [A7], Ukridge is married to Milly, whose only other appearance is in the last story in this collection, "Ukridge Rounds a Nasty Corner", when she and Ukridge are engaged but not yet married; in the other stories in this collection, and in the nine later Ukridge stories, Ukridge is neither married nor engaged (except, in "No Wedding Bells for Him", to a different girl). Similarly, in "Ukridge's Dog College", the first story in this collection, he has just been disowned by his Aunt Julia, who had been supporting him, but in some of the stories written after this collection she is again supporting him.

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A33 Bill the Conqueror  
 
1st edition: UK 1924, November 13 Methuen, London
  US 1925, February 20 George H Doran, New York

Dedication: "To my Father and Mother"

Bill the Conqueror, sub-titled His Invasion of England in the Springtime, was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 24 May to 12 July 1924 and in the Grand (UK) between September 1925 and October 1925.

This novel introduces the newspaper magnate Sir George Pyke (later Lord Tilbury) and his employee Percy Pilbeam, both of whom feature in several later novels.

According to McIlvaine, part of the plot was used in the Kern-Bolton-Wodehouse musical comedy Sitting Pretty (1924).

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A34 Carry On, Jeeves  
 
1st edition: UK 1925, October 9 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1927, October 7 George H Doran, New York

Dedication: "To Bernard Le Strange"

This is a collection of ten Jeeves and Wooster short stories, four of them revised versions of stories in My Man Jeeves and one rewritten as a J&W story from a Reggie Pepper original in that volume. The remaining stories had previously appeared in the Strand (UK) and the Saturday Evening Post or Cosmopolitan (US).

Jeeves Takes Charge UK April 1923 Strand
 US18 November 1916Saturday Evening Post
 USMay 1993Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine
 
The Artistic Career of Corky
        (Revised version of "Leave It to Jeeves" from My Man Jeeves [A22])
 
Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest
        (Revised version of same title from My Man Jeeves)
 
Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg
        (Revised version of same title from My Man Jeeves)
 
The Aunt and the Sluggard
        (Revised version of same title from My Man Jeeves)
 
The Rummy Affair of Old BiffyUKOctober 1924Strand
 US27 September 1924Saturday Evening Post
 
Without the OptionUKJuly 1925Strand
 US27 June 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
Fixing it for Freddie 1CanSeptember 1928Canadian Home Journal
        (Rewritten version of "Helping Freddie" from My Man Jeeves)
 
Clustering Round Young BingoUKApril 1925Strand
 US21 February 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
Bertie Changes his Mind 2UKAugust 1922Strand
 USAugust 1922Cosmopolitan
 
1Previously a Reggie Pepper story
2The only J&W story in the entire canon to be narrated by Jeeves

Although Jeeves and Bertie had appeared in "Extricating Young Gussie", in The Man with Two Left Feet [A21], "Jeeves Takes Charge" is, chronologically, the first J&W story.

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A35 Sam the Sudden (US title: Sam in the Suburbs)  
 
1st edition: UK 1925, October 15 Methuen, London
  US 1925, November 6 George H Doran, New York

Dedication (UK edition): "To Edgar Wallace"

Under its US title, this was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 13 June to 18 July 1925. As Sam the Sudden, it was serialised in Sunny magazine (UK) between July 1925 and February 1926.

This book sees the reapparance of Lord Tilbury and a brief mention of Percy Pilbeam (from Bill the Conqueror [A33]) and the first appearance of Alexander "Chimp" Twist and the Molloys, Dora ("Dolly") and Thomas ("Soapy"), three minor American crooks who appear again in later novels.

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A36 The Heart of a Goof (US title: Divots)  
 
1st edition: UK 1926, April 15 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1927, May 4 George H Doran, New York

Dedication: "To my daughter Leonora without whose never-failing sympathy and encouragement this book would have been finished in half the time" (cf the dedication to A Gentleman of Leisure [A13])

This is a collection of nine stories with a golfing background. All are narrated by the Oldest Member, who made his first appearance in The Clicking of Cuthbert [A27]. All the stories had appeared previously in Strand magazine (UK) and in a US magazine (usually the Red Book or Saturday Evening Post).

The Heart of a Goof UK April 1924 Strand
 USSeptember 1923Red Book
 
High StakesUKOctober 1925Strand
 US19 September 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
Keeping in with VosperUKMarch 1926Strand
 US13 March 1926Liberty
 
Chester Forgets HimselfUKMay 1924Strand
 US7 July 1923Saturday Evening Post
 
The Magic Plus FoursUKDecember 1922Strand
 USJanuary 1923Red Book 1
 
The Awakening of Rollo PodmarshUKJanuary 1923Strand
 USMarch 1923Red Book 2
 
Rodney Fails to QualifyUKMarch 1924Strand
 US23 February 1924Saturday Evening Post
 
Jane Gets off the FairwayUKNovember 1924Strand
 US25 October 1924Saturday Evening Post
 
The Purification of Rodney SpelvinUKSeptember 1925Strand
 US22 August 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
1Magazine title: "The Plus Fours"
2Magazine title: "Rollo Podmarsh Comes To"

Three of the stories that eventually formed part of this collection — "Chester Forgets Himself", "The Magic Plus Fours" and "Rodney Fails to Qualify" — had been filmed in 1924 by a British company, Stoll Picture Productions, as part of a series of six adaptations of Wodehouse golf stories; the other three stories were taken from The Clicking of Cuthbert [A27].

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A37 The Small Bachelor  
 
1st edition: UK 1927, April 28 Methuen, London
  US 1927, June 17 George H Doran, New York

The Small Bachelor was based on the latter part of Oh Lady! Lady! 1918), one of the musical comedies produced by Kern-Bolton-Wodehouse. It was serialised in Liberty (US) from 18 September to 25 December 1926 1 and in New magazine (UK) between December 1926 and July 1927.

1    In the entry for The Small Bachelor [A37], McIlvaine gives the dates as 18 September to 30 October 1926, but she lists dates up to 25 December in the entry for Liberty [D36].

A silent film of The Small Bachelor was released in November 1927. It was adapted by Edward J Montague from the Liberty serialisation.

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A38 Meet Mr Mulliner  
 
1st edition: UK 1927, September 27 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1928, March 2 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Dedication: "To the Earl of Oxford and Asquith"; Herbert Asquith died on 15 February 1928

This is a collection of nine stories about members of the vast Mulliner clan. The stories are narrated—all but one from his corner in the bar-parlour of the Anglers' Rest—by Mr Mulliner, who makes his first appearance here. All the stories had appeared previously in Strand magazine (UK) and in a US magazine (mostly Liberty, one in the Saturday Evening Post).

The Truth about George UK July 1926 Strand
 US3 July 1926Liberty
 
A Slice of LifeUKAugust 1926Strand
 US7 August 1926Liberty
 
Mulliner's Buck-U-UppoUKNovember 1926Strand
 US4 September 1926Liberty
 
The Bishop's MoveUKSeptember 1927Strand
 US20 August 1927Liberty
 
Came the DawnUKJuly 1927Strand
 US11 June 1927Liberty
 
The Story of WilliamUKMay 1927Strand
 US9 April 1927Liberty 1
 
Portrait of a DisciplinarianUKOctober 1927Strand
 US24 September 1927Liberty
 
The Romance of a Bulb-SqueezerUKMarch 1927Strand
 US12 March 1927Liberty
 
Honeysuckle Cottage 2UKFebruary 1925Strand
 US24 January 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
1Magazine title: "It Was Only a Fire"
2Rewritten as a Mulliner story for the book; not narrated from the Anglers' Rest
 
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A39 Money for Nothing  
 
1st edition: UK 1928, July 27 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1928, September 28 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Dedication (UK edition): "To Ian Hay Beith"

This was serialised in London Calling magazine (UK) from 3 March to 28 July 1928 and in Liberty (US) from 16 June to 22 September 1928.

Two of the characters in Money for Nothing, Hugo Carmody and Ronnie Fish, also feature in the Blandings novels Summer Lightning [A41] and Heavy Weather [A50]. The novel also sees the reappearance of "Chimp" Twist and the Molloys, the trio of crooks who first appeared in Sam the Sudden [A35].

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A40 Mr Mulliner Speaking  
 
1st edition: UK 1929, April 30 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1930, February 21 Doubleday, Doran, New York

This is the second collection of nine stories about members of the vast Mulliner clan, narrated by Mr Mulliner. All the stories had appeared previously in Strand magazine (UK) and in various US magazines. The last three stories feature Bobby Wickham and, in their magazine versions, were not Mulliner stories.

The Reverent Wooing of Archibald UK August 1928 Strand
 USSeptember 1928Cosmopolitan
 
The Man Who Gave Up SmokingUKMarch 1929Strand
 US23 March 1929Liberty
 
The Story of CedricUKMay 1929Strand
 US11 May 1929Liberty
 
The Ordeal of Osbert MullinerUKDecember 1928Strand
 US24 November 1928Liberty
 
Unpleasantness at Bludleigh CourtUKFebruary 1929Strand
 US2 February 1929Liberty
 
Those in Peril on the TeeUKJune 1927Strand
 US21 May 1927Liberty 1
 
Something Squishy 2UKJanuary 1925Strand
 US20 December 1924Saturday Evening Post
 
The Awful Gladness of the Mater 2UKMay 1925Strand
 US21 March 1925Saturday Evening Post 3
 
The Passing of Ambrose 2UKJuly 1928Strand
 USAugust 1928Cosmopolitan
 
1Magazine version narrated by the Oldest Member
2Rewritten as a Mulliner story for the book
3Magazine title: "Awful Gladness of the Mater"
 
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A41 Summer Lightning (US title: Fish Preferred)  
 
1st edition: US 1929, July 1 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1929, July 19 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (UK edition): "To Denis Mackail, author of 'Greenery Street', 'The Flower Show' and other books which I wish I had written"

Summer Lightning was serialised in Pall Mall magazine (UK) between March and August 1929 and in Collier's (US) from 6 April to 22 June 1929, in both cases under its English title.

Summer Lightning sees the re-appearance of Percy Pilbeam (from Bill the Conqueror [A33]) and introduces Lord Emsworth's younger brother, the Hon Galahad ("Gally") Threepwood, who appears in a further six Blandings novels, the next being Heavy Weather [A50], which forms the sequel to Summer Lightning.

The novel was adapted for the cinema in 1933, with a screenplay by Miles Malleson, who also played the role of Beach. It was adapted for the stage by Giles Havergal, the Director of Glasgow's Citizens Theatre, where it was performed between 21 February and 14 March 1992; it has since been revived a number of times, at Salisbury in 1998, at Northampton in 2004, at Pitlochry in 2006, and most recently as part of the 2009 Summer Season at the Theatre by the Lake, Keswick, in the English Lake District.

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A42 Very Good, Jeeves  
 
1st edition: US 1930, June 20 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1930, July 4 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (UK edition): "To E Phillips Oppenheim"

This is a collection of eleven Jeeves and Wooster short stories, all of which had previously appeared in the Strand (UK) and in Liberty or Cosmopolitan (US).

Jeeves and the Impending Doom UK December 1926 Strand
 US8 January 1927Liberty
 
The Inferiority Complex of Old SippyUKApril 1926Strand
 US17 April 1926Liberty 1
 
Jeeves and the Yule-tide SpiritUKDecember 1927Strand
 US24 December 1927Liberty
 
Jeeves and the Song of SongsUKSeptember 1929Strand
 USSeptember 1929Cosmopolitan 2
 
Episode of the Dog McIntosh 3UKOctober 1929Strand 3
 USOctober 1929Cosmopolitan 4
 
The Spot of Art 5UKDecember 1929Strand
 USDecember 1929Cosmopolitan 5
 
Jeeves and the Kid ClementinaUKJanuary 1930Strand
 USJanuary 1930Cosmopolitan
 
The Love That Purifies 6UKNovember 1929Strand 6
 USNovember 1929Cosmopolitan 6
 
Jeeves and the Old School ChumUKFebruary 1930Strand
 USFebruary 1930Cosmopolitan
 
Indian Summer of an Uncle 7UKMarch 1930Strand
 USMarch 1930Cosmopolitan
 
The Ordeal of Young Tuppy 8UKApril 1930Strand 8
 USApril 1930Cosmopolitan 8
 
1Magazine title: "Inferiority Complex of Old Sippy"
2Magazine title: "The Song of Songs"
3US edition and magazine title: "Jeeves and the Dog McIntosh"
4Magazine title: "The Borrowed Dog"
5US edition and magazine title: "Jeeves and the Spot of Art"
6US edition and magazine titles: "Jeeves and the Love That Purifies"
7US edition: "The Indian Summer of an Uncle"
8US edition and magazine titles: "Tuppy Changes His Mind"
 
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A43 Big Money  
 
1st edition: US 1931, January 30 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1931, March 20 Herbert Jenkins, London

Big Money was serialised in Collier's (US) from 20 September to 6 December 1930 and in Strand magazine (UK) between October 1930 and April 1931.

The novel is set partly in the London suburb of Valley Fields and reintroduces Mr Cornelius, the estate agent, who first appeared in Sam the Sudden [A35].

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A44 If I Were You  
 
1st edition: US 1931, September 3 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1931, September 25 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (US edition): "To Guy Bolton"

If I Were You was based on a play of the same name by Wodehouse and Guy Bolton which, according to Taves, was published but never performed. It was serialised in American Magazine (US) between April and July 1931 and in the Daily Mail (UK) from 5 June to 3 July 1931.

The book was re-adapted for the stage by Wodehouse and Bolton under the title Who's Who? It received its first performance at the Duke of York's Theatre, London, on 20 September 1934, with Peter Haddon as Tony and Ivor Barnard as Syd Price: Haddon had previously played Cuthbert in the 1924 film of The Clicking of Cuthbert and played Bill in the 1939 film adaptation of Good Morning, Bill.

Bolton later adapted the play as a musical, Who's Who, Baby?, with music and lyrics by Johnny Brandon. It opened at The Players Theater, New York, on 29 January 1968 1, though, according to McIlvaine, Bolton asked for his and Wodehouse's names to be removed from the programme.

1    McIlvaine (p 305) says 2 February, but the NY Times reviewed it on 30 January.

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A45 Louder and Funnier  
 
1st edition: UK 1932, March 10 Faber & Faber, London

Dedication: "To George Blake, A Splendid Fellow and Very Sound on Pekes", followed by a footnote: "But he should guard against the tendency to claim that his Peke fights Alsatians. Mine is the only one that does this."

Louder and Funnier is a collection of essays, most of which are loosely based on articles that had appeared in Vanity Fair (US) between 1914 and 1923, many under pseudonyms. Wodehouse revised these articles substantially, even to the extent of merging two articles into a single essay. Several of the revised versions were published in magazines prior to publication of Louder and Funnier and there are only minor differences between these and the corresponding essays in the book. In the following list, the original Vanity Fair articles are given in parentheses; articles from other magazines are detailed in the footnotes:

 The Hollywood Scandal 3  
 
 Literature and the Arts
    1    To the Editor - Sir ...
 
    2    My Gentle Readers 4
 
    3    Thrillers 5(A School for Movie Villains) 2October 1915
 
 Literature and the Arts
    1    Fair Play for Audiences 6
 
 
(Reviewing a Theatre Audience)
(Another Proposed Union) 1
 
November 1919
May 1916
 
    2    Looking Back at the Halls
 
 
(The Nation's Songs)
(An Appreciation of Vaudeville)
 
December 1919
February 1917
 
    3    An Outline of Shakespeare
 
 
(What Really Happened to Hamlet) 2
(All about Shakespeare) 1
 
June 1915
April 1916
 
 Sports and Pastimes
    1    The Decay of Falconry7
 
(The Noble Art of Falconry)
 
October 1914
 
    2    A Day with the Swattesmore 8
 
(A Little Chat About a Favorite
   Summer Sport) 2
September 1916
 
    3    Prospects for Wambledon 9
 
(A Great Coming Tennis Match) 2
 
October 1916
 
 Fashionable Weddings and Smart
   Divorces
 
(All About Fashionable Weddings) 1
(All About the Pastime of Divorce) 2
 
January 1916
May 1915
 
 Happy Christmas and Merry
   New Year
 
(Christmas Presents) 1
 (All about New Year's Day) 1 10
 
December 1915
January 1917
 
 Thoughts on the Income Tax 11
 
(All About the Income Tax)
 
May 1919
 
 Butlers and the Buttled 12
 
(All About Butlers) 1 13
 
February 1916
 
 A Word about Amusement Parks 14
 
 
(The So-called Pleasures of
   Coney Island) 1
 
August 1915
 
 
 The Small Gambler
    1    Roulette 15
 
    2    Chemin de Fer
 
 On Ocean Liners
 
(Should Ocean Liners be Abolished)
 
January 1923
 
 Photographs and Photographers 16
 
(On Being Photographed) 1
 
March 1916
 
1Under the pseudonym P Brooke-Haven
2Under the pseudonym Pelham Grenville
3Revised version of "Slaves of Hollywood" from Saturday Evening Post, 7 December 1929
4Reprinted with minor changes from "My Gentle Readers" in Strand magazine, August 1930
5Part is revised version of "About These Mystery Stories" from Saturday Evening Post, 26 May 1929
6Appeared under this title in Pall Mall magazine, August 1928 (derived from the VF articles)
7Appeared under this title in John O'London's Weekly, 6 December 1924
8Appeared under this title in the Daily Mail newspaper, 20 May 1929
9Appeared under this title in Strand magazine, August 1929, (derived from the VF article)
10Appeared under this title in Sunday World (US), 29 December 1929
11Appeared under this title in the Daily Mail newspaper, 2 April 1929
12Appeared under this title in Piccadilly magazine, 27 April 1929
13Appeared under this title in Printer's Pie (UK), 1 January 1916
14Appeared as "On Amusement Parks" in the Daily Mail newspaper, 2 September 1929
15Reprinted almost unchanged from "The Small Gambler" in Pall Mall magazine, May 1913
16Appeared as "On Photographs and Photographers", Nash's magazine, September 1929

Two articles in the Daily Mail probably relate to "The Hollywood Scandal". They are "The White Slaves of Hollywood" and "The Fatal Lure of Hollywood", published on 6 and 7 December 1929 respectively.

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A46 Doctor Sally  
 
1st edition: UK 1932, April 7 Methuen, London

Doctor Sally is a novella which Wodehouse adapted from his play Good Morning, Bill, which in turn was described as "based on the Hungarian of Ladislaus Fodor".

It was serialised in the Yorkshire Weekly Post Illustrated from 2 January to 27 February 1931[probably 1932 —Ed.] and, under the title The Medicine Girl, in Collier's (US) from 4 July to 1 August 1931; it was collected in book form under the same title in The Crime Wave at Blandings [A58].

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A47 Hot Water  
 
1st edition: UK 1932, August 17 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1932, August 17 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Dedication: "To Maureen O'Sullivan, with love from Ethel, Leonora, Miss Winks, John-John, and The Author"

Hot Water was serialised in Collier's (US) from 21 May to 6 August 1932.

Wodehouse and Guy Bolton subsequently adapted the novel for the stage as The Inside Stand, which received its first performances at the Alhambra Theatre, Glasgow, and at the Saville Theatre, London, where it opened on 21 November 1935.

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A48 Mulliner Nights  
 
1st edition: UK 1933, January 17 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1933, February 15 Doubleday, Doran, New York

This is another collection of nine Mulliner short stories, narrated by Mr Mulliner. All the stories had appeared previously in the Strand (UK) and in either American Magazine or Cosmopolitan (US).

The Smile That Wins UK February 1932 Strand
 USOctober 1931American Magazine
 
The Story of WebsterUKMay 1932Strand 1
 USFebruary 1932American Magazine 1
 
Cats Will Be CatsUKJune 1932Strand 2
 USMarch 1932American Magazine 2
 
The Knightly Quest of Mervyn 3UKJuly 1931Strand 4
 USApril 1931Cosmopolitan 4
 
The Voice from the PastUKDecember 1931Strand
 USNovember 1931American Magazine 5
 
Open HouseUKApril 1932Strand
 USApril 1932American Magazine
 
Best SellerUKJuly 1930Strand 6
 USJune 1930Cosmopolitan 7
 
Strychnine in the SoupUKMarch 1932Strand
 USDecember 1931American Magazine 8
 
Gala NightUKJune 1930Strand
 USMay 1930Cosmopolitan
 
1Magazine title: "The Bishop's Cat"
2Magazine title: "The Bishop's Folly"
3Originally a Freddie Widgeon story; rewritten as a Mulliner story for the book
4Magazine title: "Quest"
5Magazine title: "A Voice from the Past"
6Rewritten version of "Parted Ways", Strand, December 1914
7Rewritten version of "Parted Ways", Pictorial Review, June 1915; Mulliner frame added for the book
8Magazine title: "The Missing Mystery"

"Quest", the original version of "The Knightly Quest of Mervyn", which differs materially in its beginning and conclusion, was published in book form in 1975.

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A50 Heavy Weather  
 
1st edition: US 1933, July 28 Little, Brown, New York
  UK 1933, August 10 Herbert Jenkins, London

Heavy Weather was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 27 May to 15 July 1933. It forms a sequel to Summer Lightning [A41], though it can be read independently.

As well as featuring "Gally" Threepwood and Percy Pilbeam, who previously appeared in Summer Lightning, Heavy Weather sees the re-appearance of several characters previously met in non-series novels: Lord Tilbury from Sam the Sudden [A35], and Hugo Carmody and Ronnie Fish from Money for Nothing [A39] (via Summer Lightning). The novel also introduces Monty Bodkin, who later appears in two non-Blandings novels, The Luck of the Bodkins [A54] and Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin [A95].

The novel was adapted for BBC television in 1995, with Peter O'Toole as Lord Emsworth and Richard Briers as Galahad Threepwood; it was later released on video.

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A51 Thank You, Jeeves  
 
1st edition: UK 1934, March 16 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1934, April 23 Little, Brown, New York

Thank You, Jeeves was serialised in the Strand (UK) between August 1933 and February 1934, and in Cosmopolitan (US) between January and June 1934.

Twentieth Century Fox released a film under this name in 1937, with David Niven as Bertie and Arthur Treacher as Jeeves, but the names are all that the film and book have in common.

The novel was adapted for television as part of the 1990s television series Jeeves and Wooster, which featured Hugh Laurie as Bertie and Stephen Fry as Jeeves. Two episodes of the second series were based on the novel: episode 4, "Jeeves in the Country", broadcast on 5 May 1991; and episode 5, "Kidnapped!", broadcast on 12 May 1991.

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A52 Right Ho, Jeeves (US title: Brinkley Manor)  
 
1st edition: UK 1934, October 5 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1934, October 15 Little, Brown, New York

Dedication (UK edition): "To Raymond Needham KC with affection and admiration"; Needham was a barrister who successfully defended Wodehouse in a tax case brought by the Inland Revenue.

Right Ho, Jeeves was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 23 December 1933 to 27 January 1934, in Grand magazine (UK) between April and September 1934, and in the Yorkshire Weekly Post Illustrated from 21 July to 22 October 1934.

The novel was adapted for television as part of the 1990s television series Jeeves and Wooster, which featured Hugh Laurie as Bertie and Stephen Fry as Jeeves. Two episodes of the first series were based on the novel: episode 4, "The Hunger Strike", broadcast on 13 May 1990; and episode 5, "Brinkley Manor", broadcast on 20 May 1990.

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A53 Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (US title: Blandings Castle)  
 
1st edition: UK 1935, April 12 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1935, September 20 Doubleday, Doran, New York

This is a collection of 12 short stories, six set at Blandings Castle, one a Bobbie Wickham story, and the last five—all with a Hollywood setting—narrated by Mr Mulliner. All the stories had appeared previously in the Strand (UK) and all except the last in various American magazines.

The Custody of the Pumpkin UK December 1924 Strand
 US29 November 1924Saturday Evening Post
 
Lord Emsworth Acts for the BestUKJune 1926Strand
 US5 June 1926Liberty
 
Pig-hoo-o-o-o-ey!UKAugust 1927Strand
 US9 July 1927Liberty
 
Company for GertrudeUKSeptember 1928Strand
 USOctober 1928Cosmopolitan
 
The Go-GetterUKAugust 1931Strand
 USMarch 1931Cosmopolitan 1
 
Lord Emsworth and the Girl FriendUKNovember 1928Strand
 US6 October 1928Liberty
 
Mr Potter Takes a Rest CureUKFebruary 1926Strand
 US23 January 1926Liberty 2
 
Monkey Business 3UKDecember 1932Strand
 USDecember 1932American Magazine 4
 
The NodderUKJanuary 1933Strand
 USJanuary 1933American Magazine 5
 
The Juice of an OrangeUKFebruary 1933Strand
 USFebruary 1933American Magazine 6
 
The Rise of Minna Nordstrom 7UKApril 1933Strand
 USMarch 1933American Magazine 8
 
The CastawaysUKJune 1933Strand
 
1Magazine title: "Sales Resistance"
2Magazine title: "The Rest Cure"
3Very minor differences between UK and US editions
4Magazine title: "A Cagey Gorilla"
5Magazine title: "Love Birds"
6Magazine title: "Love on a Diet"
7Mulliner frame added for the book
8Magazine title: "A Star is Born"

The book was published with a Preface in which Wodehouse assigned the Blandings stories chronologically to the interval between the events in Leave It to Psmith [A31] and those in Summer Lightning [A41]. In particular, "The Custody of the Pumpkin" belongs to Lord Emsworth's "brief pumpkin phase which preceded the more lasting pig seizure".

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A54 The Luck of the Bodkins  
 
1st edition: UK 1935, October 11 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1936, January 3 Little, Brown, New York

The UK and US editions of The Luck of the Bodkins differ significantly, though the story remains essentially the same.

In the UK, the story was serialised in The Passing Show from 21 September to 23 November 1935, before being published as the UK edition.

In the US, the Saturday Evening Post rejected the story. Although the reason for the SEP's rejection was connected with Wodehouse's tax troubles with the IRS, Wodehouse thought the story had been rejected because it was too long, so he re-wrote and shortened it, and offered it to Red Book, where it was serialised between August 1935 and January 1936. This shorter version was then published as the US edition.

The story develops one of the sub-plots from Heavy Weather [A50] and is continued in Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin [A95].

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A55 Young Men in Spats  
 
1st edition: UK 1936, April 3 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1936, July 24 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Young Men in Spats is a collection of short stories. The contents of the UK and US editions differ significantly: in the following list, blue titles appeared only in the UK edition, red titles only in the US edition.

Of the 11 stories in the UK edition, all except the last ("The Fiery Wooing of Mordred") concern various members of the Drones Club; the last three are narrated by Mr Mulliner. In the US edition, two Drones stories are replaced by three Oldest Member golf stories: the two Drones stories were included one each in The Crime Wave at Blandings [A58] and the US edition of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets [A62], while the three Oldest Member stories were included in Lord Emsworth and Others [A57].

All the stories in both editions appeared in the Strand (UK) and in various US magazines, mostly in Cosmopolitan.

Fate UK May 1931 Strand
 USMay 1931Cosmopolitan 1
 
Tried in the FurnaceUKSeptember 1935Strand
 USMarch 1937Cosmopolitan
 
Trouble Down at TudsleighUKMay 1935Strand
 USMay 1939Cosmopolitan
 
The Amazing Hat MysteryUKJune 1934Strand
 USAugust 1933Cosmopolitan
 
Good-bye to All CatsUKDecember 1934Strand
 USNovember 1934Cosmopolitan
 
The Luck of the StiffhamsUKMarch 1934Strand
 USNovember 1933Cosmopolitan
 
Noblesse ObligeUKNovember 1934Strand
 USSeptember 1934Cosmopolitan
 
Uncle Fred Flits ByUKDecember 1935Strand
 USJuly 1935Red Book
 
Archibald and the MassesUKFebruary 1936Strand
 USAugust 1935Cosmopolitan
 
The Code of the Mulliners UKApril 1935Strand
 USFebruary 1935Cosmopolitan
 
The Fiery Wooing of MordredUKFebruary 1935Strand
 USDecember 1934Cosmopolitan
 
Farewell to LegsUKMay 1936Strand
 US14 July 1935This Week
 
The Letter of the LawUKApril 1936Strand
 USFebruary 1936Red Book 2
 
There's Always Golf!UKMarch 1936Strand
 USApril 1936Red Book 3
 
1Magazine title: "Compromised"
2Magazine title: "A Triple Threat Man"
3Magazine title: "Not Out of Distance"

"Tried in the Furnace" features the first appearance of Pongo Twistleton. In "Uncle Fred Flits By" he is joined by his "Uncle Fred"—Frederick Altamont Cornwallis Twistleton, 5th Earl of Ickenham—and together they appear in four subsequent novels, two of them—Uncle Fred in the Springtime [A61] and Service with a Smile [A85]— set at Blandings Castle.

"Uncle Fred Flits By" has been dramatised for television three times: in 1953, David Niven starred as Uncle Fred in an adaptation by Montgomery Ford for NBC's "Hollywood Opening Night" series; in 1955, Niven had the lead again in an adaptation by Oscar Millard for CBS's "Four Star Playhouse"; and in 1967, Wilfrid Hyde-White took the title role in an adaptation written and produced by Michael Mills for BBC's "Comedy Playhouse". The story was also adapted for the stage in 1949 by Perry Clark.

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A56 Laughing Gas  
 
1st edition: UK 1936, September 25 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1936, November 19 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Laughing Gas was serialised as a novelette in This Week (formerly the New York Herald Tribune) from 24 March to 28 April 1935 and in Pearson's magazine (UK) between August and October 1935. The book version is considerably longer than the original.

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A57 Lord Emsworth and Others  
 
1st edition: UK 1937, March 19 Herbert Jenkins, London

Lord Emsworth and Others is a collection of short stories. This title was not published in the US, where a greatly different collection was published as The Crime Wave at Blandings [A58]: of the nine stories in Lord Emsworth and Others, only three are in The Crime Wave at Blandings, which includes four stories that are not in the UK book. In the list that follows, titles in purple appear in both books.

All the stories appeared in the Strand (UK) and in various US magazines.

The Crime Wave at Blandings UK January 1937 Strand
 US10&17 October 1936Saturday Evening Post
 
Buried TreasureUKSeptember 1936Strand
 US27 September 1936This Week 1
 
The Letter of the Law 2
 
Farewell to Legs 2
 
There's Always Golf! 2
 
The Masked TroubadourUKDecember 1936Strand
 US28 November 1936Saturday Evening Post 3
 
Ukridge and the Home from Home 4UKJune 1931Strand
 USFebruary 1931Cosmopolitan
 
The Come-back of Battling Billson 4UKJuly 1935Strand
 USJune 1935Cosmopolitan
 
The Level Business Head 4UKMay 1926Strand
 US8 May 1926Liberty
 
1Magazine title: "Hidden Treasure"
2See Young Men in Spats [A55]
3Magazine title: "Reggie and the Greasy Bird", with different setting and characters
4Included in the US edition of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets [A62]
 
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A58 The Crime Wave at Blandings  
 
1st edition: US 1937, June 25 Doubleday, Doran, New York

The Crime Wave at Blandings is a collection of six short stories and a novella. It was not published in the UK, where the very different collection Lord Emsworth and Others [A57]had already appeared. Only three of the titles in this collection—shown in purple in the list below—were also included in Lord Emsworth and Others; the other titles had already appeared (or would appear subsequently) in UK editions of other books.

The Crime Wave at Blandings 1      
 
The Medicine Girl 2
 
Buried Treasure 1
 
The Masked Troubadour 1
 
Romance at Droitgate Spa 3UKAugust 1937Strand
 US20 February 1937Saturday Evening Post
 
All's Well with Bingo 3UKApril 1937Strand
 US30 January 1937Saturday Evening Post
 
Tried in the Furnace 4
 
1See Lord Emsworth and Others [A57]
2See Doctor Sally [A46]
3Included in the UK edition of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets [A62]
4See Young Men in Spats [A55]
 
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A59 Summer Moonshine  
 
1st edition: US 1937, October 8 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1938, February 11 Herbert Jenkins, London

Summer Moonshine was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 24 July to 11 September 1937 and in Pearson's magazine (UK) between September 1937 and April 1938.

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A60 The Code of the Woosters  
 
1st edition: UK 1938, October 7 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1938, October 7 Doubleday, Doran, New York

The Code of the Woosters is the third novel in the Jeeves & Wooster series, and introduces two characters who re-appear in later stories, Roderick Spode (later Lord Sidcup) (whose next appearance is in Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit [A77]) and Sir Watkyn Bassett.

It was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 16 July to 3 September 1938 and in the London Daily Mail from 8 September to 21 October 1938.

An early working title for the novel was The Silver Cow, under which name it was mentioned in the decision of the United States Supreme Court in the case of Commissioner v Wodehouse, 337 US 369, delivered on 16 June 1949.

In chapter 4, there is a brief reference to the other major Wodehouse 'saga' when Bertie recollects "Freddie Threepwood telling me that there had been trouble at Blandings about a cousin of his wanting to marry a curate".

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A61 Uncle Fred in the Springtime  
 
1st edition: US 1939, August 18 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1939, August 25 Herbert Jenkins, London

Uncle Fred in the Springtime is the fifth novel with a Blandings setting and the first novel to feature "Uncle Fred" and his nephew Pongo Twistleton, who first appeared in one of the stories in Young Men in Spats [A55]. Sir Roderick Glossop, who otherwise appears only in the Jeeves and Wooster stories and novels, makes a brief appearance in this novel.

Although the story had been serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 22 April to 27 May 1939, the book version is the original one: to comply with a request from the SEP's editor, Wodehouse simplified the plot for the magazine version.

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A62 Eggs, Beans and Crumpets  
 
1st edition: UK 1940, April 26 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1940, May 10 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Eggs, Beans and Crumpets is a collection of short stories, most of which feature recurring characters, principally Bingo Little and Ukridge. The contents of the UK and US editions differ significantly: in the following list, blue titles appeared only in the UK edition, red titles only in the US edition.

All the stories appeared in the Strand (UK) and in various US magazines. mostly the Saturday Evening Post.

All's Well with Bingo 1      
 
Bingo and the Peke CrisisUKJune 1937Strand
 US29 May 1937Saturday Evening Post
 
The Editor RegretsUKSeptember 1939Strand
 US1 July 1939Saturday Evening Post
 
Sonny BoyUKDecember 1939Strand
 US2 September 1939Saturday Evening Post
 
Anselm Gets His ChanceUKJuly 1937Strand
 US3 July 1937Saturday Evening Post
 
Romance at Droitgate Spa 1
 
A Bit of Luck for MabelUKJanuary 1926Strand
 US26 December 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
Buttercup DayUKDecember 1925Strand
 US21 November 1925Saturday Evening Post
 
Ukridge and the Old StepperUKJune 1928Strand
 US9 June 1928Liberty
 US6 October 1929New York World
 
Ukridge and the Home from Home 2
 
Trouble Down at Tudsleigh 3
 
Scratch Man 4UKSeptember 1940Strand 6
 US20 January 1940Saturday Evening Post 6
 
The Level Business Head 2
 
The Come-back of Battling Billson 2
 
Bramley is So Bracing 5UKDecember 1940Strand
 US28 October 1939Saturday Evening Post
 
1See The Crime Wave at Blandings [A58]
2See Lord Emsworth and Others [A57]
3See Young Men in Spats [A55]
4Included in A Few Quick Ones [A82]
5Included in Nothing Serious [A70]
6Magazine title: "Tee for Two"
 
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A63 Quick Service  
 
1st edition: UK 1940, October 4 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1940, December 27 Doubleday, Doran, New York

Quick Service was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 4 May to 22 June 1940.

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A64 Money in the Bank  
 
1st edition: US 1942, January 9 Doubleday, Doran, New York
  UK 1946, May 27 Herbert Jenkins, London

Wodehouse wrote Money in the Bank during his internment. It was serialised in the Saturday Evening Post (US) from 8 November to 27 December 1941 and the US book edition was published two weeks later.

Publication of the UK edition was delayed until 1946; uniquely among Wodehouse's books, Money in the Bank had been published in two other countries— in 1942 in Sweden (from the American plates), and in 1943 in Germany (in the Tauchnitz Edition), both in English—before it was published in England.

The Tauchnitz Edition includes a dedication: "To Bert Haskins with deep affection from the Author"; Haskins was a fellow-internee.

Money in the Bank is the third novel to feature the trio of American crooks, "Chimp" Twist and the Molloys, who had previously appeared in Sam the Sudden [A35] and Money for Nothing [A39].

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A65 Joy in the Morning  
 
1st edition: US 1946, August 22 Doubleday, New York
  UK 1947, June 2 Herbert Jenkins, London

Joy in the Morning is the 4th full-length Jeeves and Wooster story.

Since 1983 there have been at least two paperback editions in the US under the title Jeeves in the Morning.

Joy in the Morning was dramatised in seven episodes for BBC Radio in 1978 as part of the series What Ho, Jeeves!, featuring Richard Briers as Wooster and Michael Hordern as Jeeves.

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A66 Full Moon  
 
1st edition: US 1947, May 22 Doubleday, New York
  UK 1947, October 17 Herbert Jenkins, London

Full Moon is the 6th full-length Blandings Castle story. A condensed version appeared in Liberty magazine (US) in November 1947, the month after publication of the UK edition.

The story features re-appearances by Lord Emsworth's second son, Freddie—last seen in Leave It to Psmith [A31]—and younger brother, Galahad ("Gally"), who previously appeared in Summer Lightning [A41] and Heavy Weather [A50]. One of the main sub-plots is continued in Galahad at Blandings [A88].

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A67 Spring Fever  
 
1st edition: UK 1948, May 20 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1948, May 20 Doubleday, New York

According to Usborne, Wodehouse adapted Spring Fever as a play, giving it an American setting and characters, as a vehicle for the character actor Edward Everett Horton, but when other commitments prevented Horton from using the play, Wodehouse reworked it as a new novel, The Old Reliable [A71].

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A68 Uncle Dynamite  
 
1st edition: UK 1948, October 22 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1948, November 29 Didier, New York

The "Uncle" of the title is Frederick, 5th Earl of Ickenham. Uncle Dynamite is the second novel featuring him and his nephew, Pongo Twistleton, who had previously appeared together in the short story "Uncle Fred Flits By" (see Young Men in Spats [A55]) and in the novel Uncle Fred in the Springtime [A61]. A condensed version appeared in Liberty magazine (US) in April 1949.

In 1994, BBC Radio broadcast a dramatisation of Uncle Dynamite in six episodes, with Richard Briers as Uncle Fred and Hugh Grant as Pongo.

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A69 The Mating Season  
 
1st edition: UK 1949, September 9 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1949, November 29 Didier, New York

The Mating Season is the fifth full-length Jeeves and Wooster novel. A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 12 November 1949, just prior to publication of the US edition.

The story was dramatised in five episodes for BBC Radio in 1975 as part of the series What Ho, Jeeves!, featuring Richard Briers as Wooster and Michael Hordern as Jeeves. The novel was adapted for the stage in 1955, under the title Too Much Springtime, by Marjorie Duhan Adler.

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A70 Nothing Serious  
 
1st edition: UK 1950, July 21 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1951, May 24 Doubleday, New York

This is a collection of 10 short stories, including five Oldest Member golf stories, one Blandings story, and one Ukridge story.

Three of the stories had not previously appeared in print and the only one to have previously appeared in the UK was "Bramley is So Bracing", which was Wodehouse's last contribution to Strand magazine.

The UK and US editions have the same contents, even though "Bramley is So Bracing" had already been included in the US edition of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets [A62].

The Shadow Passes     Not previously published
 
Bramley is So Bracing 1
 
Up from the Depths  Not previously published
 
Feet of ClayUS18 June 1950This Week 2
 
ExcelsiorUS1 July 1948Argosy 3
 
Rodney has a RelapseCanFebruary 1949National Home Monthly 4
 
Tangled HeartsUSSeptember 1948Cosmopolitan 5
 
Birth of a SalesmanUS26 March 1950This Week
 
How's That, Umpire?  Not previously published
 
Success StoryUS1 March 1948Argosy 6
 
1Previously included in the US edition of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets [A62]
2Magazine title: "A Slightly Broken Romance"
3Magazine title: "Hazards of Horace Bewstridge"
4Magazine title: "Rupert Has a Relapse"
5Magazine title: "I'll Give You Some Advice"
6Magazine title: "Ukie Invests in Human Nature"
 
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A71 The Old Reliable  
 
1st edition: UK 1951, April 18 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1951, October 11 Doubleday, New York

The Old Reliable was serialised in Collier's magazine from 24 June to 22 July 1950, under the title "Phipps to the Rescue".

In one of the letters in Performing Flea, Wodehouse wrote ". . . that play of mine, the one I made into my novel, The Old Reliable [see above]. I wrote about six versions of it, but couldn't get it right, and finally handed it over to Guy [Bolton], who wrote almost a completely new play, which was wonderful . . ."; but Wodehouse's verdict was not shared by producers and the Bolton version never reached the stage.

The novel was adapted as a TV movie in 1988 with Lynn Redgrave in the title role as Wilhemina 'Bill' Shannon.

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A72 Barmy in Wonderland (US title: Angel Cake)  
 
1st edition: UK 1952, April 21 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1952, May 8 Doubleday, New York

Dedication (US edition): "To the onlie begetter of these insuing sonnets Mr G S K" [George S Kaufman]

Barmy in Wonderland was adapted from a play, The Butter and Egg Man (1925), by American playwright and humorist George S Kaufman. Wodehouse used much of the play's dialogue, and assigned half his royalties from the book to Kaufman.

A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 13 September 1952 under the US title, Angel Cake.

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A73 Pigs Have Wings  
 
1st edition: US 1952, October 16 Doubleday, New York
  UK 1952, October 31 Herbert Jenkins, London

Pigs Have Wings is the seventh novel with a Blandings Castle setting. It was serialised in Collier's magazine from 16 August to 20 July 1952.

Part of the plot is recycled from the short story, "Indian Summer of an Uncle".

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A74 Ring for Jeeves (US title: The Return of Jeeves)  
 
1st edition: UK 1953, April 22 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1954, April 15 Simon and Schuster, New York

Ring for Jeeves is the sixth novel to feature Jeeves, and the only one in which Bertie Wooster does not appear (though he is mentioned). It is a novelised version of Come On, Jeeves, a play that Wodehouse co-wrote with Guy Bolton, from an idea of Bolton's: the play was to have been called Derby Day until it was discovered that there was a film of that name.

There are significant differences between the UK and US editions. In the latter, the structure of the early chapters was changed; for example, chapter 1 in in the UK edition became chapter 5 in the US edition. The US edition also follows the play in featuring the Earl of Towcester: he was the Earl of Rowcester in the UK edition.

Condensed versions of the novel appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 5 September 1953, as Ring for Jeeves, and in the Ladies' Home Journal (US) in April 1954, as The Return of Jeeves.

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A75 Bring on the Girls!  
 
1st edition: US 1953, October 5 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1954, May 21 Herbert Jenkins, London

Bring on the Girls!, co-authored with Guy Bolton, is a semi-autobiographic account of the years they spent working together on Broadway musical productions. Although the book has a factual basis, it is not reliable as autobiography, most of the stories in it having been "spiced up" to increase their entertainment value.

The UK edition was rewritten to give greater prominence to the London productions of their works and was illustrated with a different srt of photographs.

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A76 Performing Flea (US title: Author! Author!)  
 
1st edition: UK 1953, October 9 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1962, June 20 Simon and Schuster, New York

Dedication (US edition): To Peter Schwed but for whom . . ."; Schwed was Wodehouse's editor at Simon and Schuster.

Performing Flea has the sub-titled "A Self-Portrait in Letters" and is a collection of letters that Wodehouse wrote to his friend Bill Townend over a period of nearly a quarter-century. Many of the letters deal with the technicalities of the writer's craft, others with Wodehouse's time in Hollywood and in internment. The drawback to the collection as autobiography is that many of the letters were edited or revised for publication. The letters were introduced and annotated by Townend.

The book's title was Wodehouse's way of deflecting an insult from Irish playwright Sean O'Casey who, in a letter to The Daily Telegraph, published on 8 July 1941, shortly after the Berlin broadcasts, wrote: "If England has any dignity left in the way of literature, she will forget for ever the pitiful antics of English literature's performing flea".

The US edition, Author! Author!, was extensively revised, with commentary by Wodehouse replacing much of Townend's contribution.

The Penguin edition of Performing Flea, published in 1961, includes the text of the five Berlin broadcasts; these were not in the Herbert Jenkins hardback edition.

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A77 Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit (US title: Bertie Wooster Sees It Through)  
 
1st edition: UK 1954, October 15 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1955, February 23 Simon and Schuster, New York

Dedication (US edition): an open letter to Peter Schwed, adapted from "To—", an article that appeared in Punch on 31 March 1954, and concluding:

"To P S

Half a league
Half a league
Half a league
Onward
With a hey-nonny-nonny
And a hot cha-cha
P G Wodehouse
Colony Hatch, 1954"

Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit is the seventh novel in the Jeeves and Wooster series. It sees the re-appearance of Roderick Spode (now Lord Sidcup), who first appeared in The Code of the Woosters [A60] and who turns up again in Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves [A86].

A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 4 December 1954 under the title Double Jeopardy.

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A78 French Leave  
 
1st edition: UK 1956, January 20 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1959, September 28 Simon and Schuster, New York

An abridged version of French Leave was published in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 24 September 1955 and was serialised in John Bull (UK) from 12 November to 3 December 1955.

The book is a novelisation of Guy Bolton's stage play, Three Blind Mice, which had been performed in London and had been filmed three times, as Three Blind Mice (1938) with Loretta Young and David Niven, as Moon over Miami (1941) with Betty Grable, and as Three Little Girls in Blue (1946), as well as being transformed into a stage musical as Walk with Music (1940).

Bolton wrote Three Blind Mice under the pseudonym Stephen Powys, which Wodehouse 'borrowed' when he and Bolton (the latter using his real name) collaborated on the comedy play Don't Listen Ladies (1948), an adaptation of Sacha Guitry's N'écoutez pas, mesdames.

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A79 Over Seventy (US title: America, I Like You)  
 
1st edition: US 1956, May 3 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1957, October 11 Herbert Jenkins, London

Sub-titled "An Autobiography with Digressions", Over Seventy is less an autobiography, more a collection of reminiscences and anecdotes, interspersed with extracts from Wodehouse's journalism, mainly from Punch magazine. The US version, America, I Like You, is different in structure, sequence, and about half the content, and is more slanted toward an American readership. The two versions are essentially different books.

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A80 Something Fishy (US title: The Butler Did It)  
 
1st edition: UK 1957, January 18 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1957, January 28 Simon and Schuster, New York

Something Fishy is partly set in one of Wodehouse's favourite locations, Valley Fields, and includes among its characters private detective Percy Pilbeam, whose last appearance had been in Heavy Weather [A50].

A condensed version of the book, under its English title, was published in Collier's magazine (US) from 31 August to 14 September 1956 and in John Bull magazine (UK) from 29 September to 13 October 1956.

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A81 Cocktail Time  
 
1st edition: UK 1958, June 20 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1958, July 24 Simon and Schuster, New York

Cocktail Time is the third novel to feature Uncle Fred and his nephew Pongo, whose previous appearance was in Uncle Dynamite [A68].

The story was published as a complete-in-one-issue condensed novel in Ladies' Home Journal (US) in April 1958.

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A82 A Few Quick Ones  
 
1st edition: US 1959, April 13 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1959, June 26 Herbert Jenkins, London

This is a collection of 10 short stories, including two golf stories, two narrated by Mr Mulliner, a Jeeves and Wooster story and an Ukridge story. The UK and US editions have nine stories in common, though they appear in a different order in the two editions: in the following list, the blue title appeared only in the UK edition, the red title only in the US edition.

The Fat of the Land 1 US 2 November 1958 This Week
 
Scratch Man 2
 
The Right Approach 3UKSeptember 1958Lilliput 4
 US20 January 1959Playboy 5
 
Jeeves Makes an Omelette 6 7UKFebruary 1959Lilliput 8
 USAugust 1959Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine 9
 Can22 August 1958Toronto Star Weekly
 
The Word in SeasonUK21 August 1940Punch
 US15 September 1940Harper's Bazaar
 US18 May 1958This Week 10
 
Big BusinessUKMarch/April 1953Lilliput 11
 US13 December 1952Collier's 11
 
Leave It to AlgyUK16 May 1959John Bull
 USMay 1954Bluebook 12
 
Joy Bells for WalterUK16 February 1957John Bull 13
 US17 October 1956This Week 13
 
A Tithe for CharityUSApril 1955Playboy
 
Unpleasantness at Kosy Kot 14  Not previously published
 
Oofy, Freddie and the Beef Trust 15 16
 
1An earlier version of "Stylish Stouts", which appeared in Plum Pie [A89]
2Previously included in the US edition of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets [A62]
3A rewritten version of "Joy Bells for Barmy", which appeared in Cosmopolitan (US), October 1947
4Mulliner frame added for the book
5No Mulliner frame; rewritten with name changes
6A rewritten version of "Doing Clarence a Bit of Good", which was collected in My Man Jeeves [A22]
7Title in US edition: "Jeeves Makes an Omelet"
8A shorter version than that in the book
9Magazine title: "Jeeves and the Stolen Venus"
10Magazine title: "Bingo Little's Wild Night Out"
11Magazine version is not a Mulliner story
12An earlier version, under the title: "The Ordeal of Bingo Little"
13Magazine title: "Keep Your Temper, Walter"
14This may be a rewritten version of "Fixing It for Freddie", which was collected in Carry On, Jeeves [A34]
15Title in US edition: "Freddie, Oofy and the Beef Trust"
16The only previous appearance of this story, under its US title, was in the omnibus volume, The Best of Wodehouse (B8), published (in the US only) on 12 September 1949, by Pocket Books, Inc, New York
 
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A83 Jeeves in the Offing (US title: How Right You Are, Jeeves)  
 
1st edition: US 1960, April 4 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1960, August 12 Herbert Jenkins, London

Jeeves in the Offing is the eighth novel in the Jeeves and Wooster series. A condensed version appeared in John Bull magazine (UK) from 29 August to 19 September 1959, in Playboy (US) in February 1960 and in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 23 April 1960, in all cases under the US title, How Right You Are, Jeeves.

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A84 Ice in the Bedroom (US title: The Ice In the Bedroom)  
 
1st edition: US 1961, February 2 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1961, October 15 Herbert Jenkins, London

Ice in the Bedroom is essentially a re-working of the plot of Sam the Sudden [A35] and sees the return of the same trio of petty crooks, "Chimp" Twist and the Molloys, "Dolly" and "Soapy", who first appeared in that book and whose last appearance had been in Money in the Bank [A64]. One of the novel's principal characters is Drones Club member Freddie Widgeon, who appears in several short stories but in only this one novel.

A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 5 November 1960 under its US title The Ice in the Bedroom.

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A85 Service with a Smile  
 
1st edition: US 1961, October 15 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1962, August 17 Herbert Jenkins, London

Service with a Smile is the eighth novel with a Blandings Castle setting. It features Uncle Fred (Lord Ickenham) and his nephew Pongo, who last appeared at Blandings in Uncle Fred in the Springtime  [A61], and who are making their fourth (and final) appearance in a novel. The story also sees the re-appearance of Lord Tilbury, last met in Heavy Weather [A50].

A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) in two parts, on 26 August and 2 September 1961.

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A86 Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves  
 
1st edition: US 1963, March 22 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1963, August 16 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (US edition): "To David Jasen"

Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves is the ninth novel in the Jeeves and Wooster series. It sees the re-appearance of Lord Sidcup (Roderick Spode), who appeared in Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit [A77] and who re-appears in Much Obliged, Jeeves [A94]

A condensed version appeared in Playboy (US) in two parts, in February and March 1963.

In the 1990s television series Jeeves and Wooster, which featured Hugh Laurie as Bertie and Stephen Fry as Jeeves, the events of the novel formed the basis for episode 5 of the final (fourth) series, "Trouble at Totleigh Towers", which was broadcast on 13 June 1993.

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A87 Frozen Assets (US title: Biffen's Millions)  
 
1st edition: US 1964, July 14 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1964, August 14 Herbert Jenkins, London

Frozen Assets is set mostly in Valley Fields and features the final appearance of Lord Tilbury, last seen in Service with a Smile [A85], and his former employee, Percy Pilbeam, whose previous appearance was in Something Fishy [A80].

A condensed version appeared in Playboy (US) in two parts, in February and March 1964, under the US title, Biffen's Millions.

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A88 Galahad at Blandings (US title: The Brinkmanship of Galahad Threepwood)  
 
1st edition: US 1964, December 31 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1965, August 26 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (US edition): "To Scott Meredith, prince of literary agents and best of friends"

Galahad at Blandings is the ninth novel in the Blandings Castle series. Part of the story is a continuation of Full Moon [A66], and several of the characters from that novel make a re-appearance. Gally Threepwood was last seen in Pigs Have Wings [A73]. There is a strong link with the Jeeves and Wooster stories in the person of Dame Daphne Winkworth who is a friend of Bertie's Aunt Agatha and a prominent character in The Mating Season [A69].

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A89 Plum Pie  
 
1st edition: UK 1966, September 22 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1967, December 1 Simon and Schuster, New York

Plum Pie is a collection of nine short stories; four had appeared in magazines prior to publication of the book, the rest appeared in magazines after the book had been published, three of them only in North America.

McIlvaine's statement that "[t]he short stories originally appeared in various issues of Playboy, January 1965-December 1967" is not strictly accurate: some of these issues post-date the book and two of the stories never appeared in Playboy at all.

In the UK edition, the stories are separated by short extracts from the "America Day by Day" and "Our Man in America" columns that Wodehouse wrote for Punch magazine from April 1956 to January 1960 and from April 1960 to June 1963 respectively, and the collection concludes with two poems and an essay (not "stories", as McIlvaine describes them).

The US edition has the same nine stories, but none of the other items. In the following list, blue titles appeared only in the UK edition.

Jeeves and the Greasy Bird UK January 1967 Argosy
 USDecember 1965Playboy
 
Extracts from Punch a
 
Sleepy TimeUKOctober 1965Argosy 1
 US5 June 1965Saturday Evening Post 1
 
Extracts from Punch b
 
Sticky Wicket at BlandingsUKApril 1967Argosy 2
 USOctober 1966Playboy 2
 
Extracts from Punch c
 
Ukridge Starts a Bank Account 3USJuly 1967Playboy
 USJune 1982Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine
 
Extracts from Punch d
 
Bingo Bans the BombUKAugust 1965Argosy
 USJanuary 1965Playboy
 
Extracts from Punch e
 
Stylish Stouts 4UK24 December 1965London Evening Standard 5
 USApril 1965Playboy
 
Extracts from Punch f
 
George and Alfred 3USJanuary 1967Playboy
 
Extracts from Punch g
 
A Good Cigar is a Smoke 3USDecember 1967Playboy
 
Extracts from Punch h
 
Life with Freddie 6Canada29 August 1970Toronto Star Weekly
 
Time Like an Ever-rolling Stream 7UK21 December 1955Punch
 
Printer's Error 7UK1 November 1954Punch Almanac
 
A Note on Humour 8UKvarious datesPunch
 
1Magazine title: "The Battle of Squashy Hollow"
2Magazine title: "First Aid for Freddie"
3No UK magazine appearance; an earlier version, "Rallying Round Old George", appeared in My Man Jeeves [A22] and in Strand magazine.
4Expanded version of magazine story
5Magazine title: "The Great Fat Uncle Contest"
6No UK or US magazine appearance
7A poem; no US magazine appearance
8Mostly original, with some material drawn from "Up the Humorists!" (Punch, 9 December 1953) and from the Introduction to The Pick of Punch: An Annual Selection (1957).

The following relates the extracts from Punch that separate the stories in the UK edition with their original magazine appearance. Each extract is identified by the opening line; ADD and OMA refer respectively to the "America Day by Day" and "Our Man in America" columns, while ECEG refers to an article entitled "Easy Come, Easy Go".

I am indebted to Ananth Kaitharam, who supplied nearly all this information, and to Ian Michaud, who identified two elusive sources.

a "Not guilty!" spectactors pouring out of a Denver, Colorado . . . OMA 28 September 1960
 Talking of reporters, considerable anxiety is being caused . . .ADD29 May 1957
 A rather interesting story comes from Toledo, Ohio . . .ADD29 May 1957
 The news that Wayburn Mace, aged six, has been given . . .ADD23 January 1957
 It is not lightly that one describes anyone as belonging . . .OMA15 June 1960
 
bThe trend in Television Westerns is now towards sweetness . . .ADD20 November 1957
 The mystery, which has puzzled so many, of where all . . .ADD20 November 1957
 Dieting continues to be all the go on this side of the Atlantic . . .ADD4 June 1958
 Good news for those who want rabbits' ears to droop . . .ADD27 March 1957
 And now let us take a quick glance at the cat situation . . .ADD20 November 1957
 
cOne of the disadvantages you fellows have who live in England . . .ECEG29 June 1955
 
dCrime continues to flourish in and around New York . . .OMA27 March 1963
 But while life is all roses and sunshine for Howard Lee White . . .OMA27 March 1963
 According to Howard Gossage, the well-known advertising man . . .OMA5 December 1962
 It has come as something of a shock to New York motorists . . .ADD23 October 1957
 And here is the latest news from Statesboro, Ga . . .OMA17 August 1960
 
eOne seems to be writing a good deal about Criminals these days . . .ADD23 October 1957
 In Newark, NJ, the authorities have been doing some rather . . .ADD25 September 1957
 The impression left on the mind when one reads in the papers . . .OMA3 May 1961
 A recently published history of Macy's department store . . .ADD12 March 1958
 
fThis has not been a good theatrical season.OMA26 June 1963
 No news from Philadelphia at the moment of going to press . . .OMA9 May 1962
 The wise guys who understand national finance have been . . .OMA11 July 1962
 Talking of dogs—not that we were, but suppose . . .OMA8 August 1962
 A funny thing happened to Gary Moore, the television comedian . . .OMA3 January 1962
 
gOne of the great traditions in America has always been . . .OMA22 March 1961
 Let us turn for a moment to the subject of cows . . .OMA22 March 1961
 An admirable suggestion has been made by Mr Wilfred S Rowe . . .OMA22 February 1961
 It was some months ago that a metal fabricating firm . . .OMA26 July 1961
 Ask anyone in Memphis, Tennessee, and they will tell you . . .OMA8 August 1962
 
hIt always happens. Just as one is feeling pretty good . . .ADD8 August 1956
 It is pretty generally agreed that we are living as of even date . . .ADD13 June 1956
 Rather sad the way America's most cherished customs . . .ADD2 January 1957
 It is unlikely, perhaps, that Mr Ernest Crowley . . .OMA26 July 1961
 
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A90 Company for Henry (US title: The Purloined Paperweight)  
 
1st edition: US 1967, May 12 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1967, October 26 Herbert Jenkins, London

Dedication (US edition): "To Peter Schwed, best of publishers"

A condensed version of the US title, The Purloined Paperweight, appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) in two parts, on 29 April and 6 May 1967.

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A91 Do Butlers Burgle Banks?  
 
1st edition: US 1968, August 5 Simon and Schuster, New York
  UK 1968, September 19 Herbert Jenkins, London

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A92 A Pelican at Blandings (US title: No Nudes Is Good Nudes)  
 
1st edition: UK 1969, September 25 Herbert Jenkins, London
  US 1970, February 11 Simon and Schuster, New York

A Pelican at Blandings is the tenth novel in the Blandings Castle series. The 'Pelican' of the title is Galahad Threepwood, a former member of a club of that name, whose previous appearance was in Galahad at Blandings [A88].

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A93 The Girl in Blue  
 
1st edition: UK 1970, October 29 Barrie & Jenkins, London
  US 1971, February 22 Simon and Schuster, New York

A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 24 April 1971.

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A94 Much Obliged, Jeeves (US title: Jeeves and the Tie That Binds)  
 
1st edition: UK 1971, October 15 Barrie & Jenkins, London
  US 1971, October 15 Simon and Schuster, New York

Much Obliged, Jeeves is the tenth novel in the Jeeves and Wooster series. Roderick Spode, Lord Sidcup, who was last seen in Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves [A86], makes his final appearance in the canon.

There is a slight difference between the endings of the UK and US editions. According to McIlvaine, Wodehouse's American editor, Peter Schwed, gave the US edition its title and rewrote the last page of the book to connect the ending with the new title.

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A95 Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin (US title: The Plot That Thickened)  
 
1st edition: UK 1972, October 12 Barrie & Jenkins, London
  US 1973, August 6 Simon and Schuster, New York

Dedication (UK edition): "To Sheran with love"

Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin is a sequel to The Luck of the Bodkins [A54], written 37 years earlier. It had the working title of The Honour of the Bodkins. The story sees the re-appearance of "Chimp" Twist and the Molloys, last seen in Ice in the Bedroom [A84].

A condensed version appeared in the Toronto Star Weekly (Canada) on 28 April 1973.

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A96 Bachelors Anonymous  
 
1st edition: UK 1973, October 15 Barrie & Jenkins, London
  US 1974, August 28 Simon and Schuster, New York

Dedication (US edition): "To Peter Schwed, as always"

Bachelors Anonymous features movie mogul Ivor Llewellyn, who appeared in two of the Monty Bodkin novels, The Luck of the Bodkins [A54] and Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin [A95].

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A97 Aunts Aren't Gentlemen (US title: The Cat-nappers)  
 
1st edition: UK 1974, October Barrie & Jenkins, London
  US 1975, April 14 Simon and Schuster, New York

This is the eleventh (and last) novel in the Jeeves and Wooster series and the last novel Wodehouse completed before his death. The US edition was published posthumously.

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A100 Sunset at Blandings  
 
1st edition: UK 1977, November 17 Chatto & Windus, London
  US 1978, September 19 Simon and Schuster, New York

Sunset at Blandings (the title was the publisher's, not Wodehouse's) would have been the eleventh novel in the Blandings series, but when Wodehouse died he had completed only 16 of a projected 22 chapters and had had no opportunity to revise the finished story, as was his custom. The incomplete novel was edited for publication by Richard Usborne, who included all Wodehouse's manuscript notes for the unwritten last six chapters.

The book also includes two essays by Usborne, one on "The Castle and Its Surroundings", the other on "The Trains between Paddington and Market Blandings", and a map of the Castle realised by Ionicus, the illustrator who designed covers for many of the Penguin editions of Wodehouse's books.

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References consulted:

None of these authorities is responsible for the errors that, despite my best efforts, undoubtedly exist.

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